Is My Organization Creating Benefit? Four types of rationale

I expect it is important for you to know if your organization is creating social benefit. I think about this a lot, both with the clients we serve, and for our consulting firm. Donors, funders, constituents, and employees also want to know. City_Harvest_Truck

Here are four different types of rationale to ascertain the benefit created by an organization. While a higher level of proof may be more desirable, it is not feasible to fully prove benefit for all activities. Thus, all four rationale can be acceptable tools to inform leaders and decision-makers.

  1. An observable, causal relationship - When City Harvest collected 46 million pounds of food from the food industry and distributed them to hungry people, there was an observable, causal relationship: hungry people have been fed. City Harvest can declare the benefit it achieves based on such numbers.
  2. Evidence-based research indicating a causal relationship - The Parent Child Home Program conducted longitudinal research showing that children who had been through their program graduated from high school at higher rates than control groups. This demonstrated a high likelihood that other children going through the program would have their chance of graduating from high school  increased. The Parent Child Home Program can use this longitudinal research as convincing evidence of its benefits.
  3. A theory of change - When Garrison Institute brings together environmentalists, industrialists and government officials and uses meditation to help them find new solutions to environmental issues, Garrison Institute believes that this will help stem environmental degradation. Because this result is difficult to measure given the vast array of factors impacting the environment, Garrison Institute relies on its theory of change to guide its choices and verify the value of this work.
  4. A personal desire - Ethel Donaghue established the Donaghue Foundation with a vision of "continual improvement in people’s health as a result of research being converted to practical benefit." In doing so, she made a choice about where to focus her resources, based on a personal desire. Given that Ethel Donaghue passed away in 1989 leaving her foundation as a permanent legacy, at this point no proof is needed to determine if Ethel's vision is where the foundation should invest.