We’re Growing... But Not Yet

Growth makes for an inspiring organizational story. Boards of Directors and staff can be mobilized around growth. But if work must be done in the near term in order to prepare for growth later, the story may be less than inspiring. People may ask, "If we can't make growth happen now, why expect it in several years?" I faced just this situation recently. One of our clients had just come off a highly successful run of completing innovative projects and raising a large amount of funding to support general operations. However, most of their major projects were nearly complete, and a campaign for unrestricted revenue was ending. These efforts seeded a huge potential for new, innovative program work and an increase in revenue, but that potential was unlikely to be realized until after several years of less outwardly visible initiatives—to plan and begin working on new educational projects, to align work internally and to improve their internal functioning. This organization therefore faced a major challenge: how to communicate with their Board about why growth wouldn't be realized right away, while still telling an inspiring story.

This nonprofit found a way to mobilize their Board members. Rather than avoiding a discussion about two years of flat budgets, the Executive Director explained exactly how the organization was preparing for growth in the future. She shared their new fundraising tactics. She described how increased coordination among staff groups would leading to higher organizational effectiveness.  She worked with her staff to develop a balanced scorecard for the organization, and committed to sharing the results regularly with the Board. And, she asked her Board to help realize the growth by forming committees around a new set of products; reaching out to bring their friends to events; and helping to find new trustees with expertise in needed areas.

As a result, Board members were galvanized and excited. Rather than being disappointed that growth would wait for several years, they were inspired to help realize future success. They understood how they could contribute, and could see clear links between the organization’s plans and the outcomes predicted.