Four Ways to Address a Problem that Won’t Go Away

We are currently working with a client that provides services for victims of crimes, particularly victims of family violence such as domestic violence and child abuse.  Family violence is a persistent issue upon which it seems almost impossible to make a dent. And so, our client wanted to know how they can have greater impact.   To find possible approaches to answer this question, we looked at how other organizations strive to have impact in the face of an enduring, seemingly insurmountable, problem.

Four aces picture

We found four possible approaches employed by other organizations, which we coined, “go upstream,” “a banner to march behind, “expand the picture,” and “strength in numbers.” 

The National Audubon Society typifies what we called “go upstream.”  This organization began with the mission of protecting birds and their habitats.  But soon an important challenge became clear:  all habitats were increasingly impacted by climate change, leading to negative consequences for birds everywhere. The “go upstream” approach posits that one’s mission is served not only through intervention services aimed at solving certain issues, but also by working on the environmental factors which cause the issues to occur in the first place.  So, The National Audubon Society decided to “go upstream” from the bird territory and now has a more general focus on protecting the environment with the downstream goal of saving birds’ habitats.  What could this mean for our client?  Perhaps they address those things that contribute to family violence occurring in the first place, like poverty. Or, they work to prevent the perpetuation of the cycles of violence by helping abused children heal from their trauma, thereby reducing the likelihood that they will grow up to be re-victimized or will abuse others.

“A banner to march behind” is well exemplified by The March of Dimes.  The assumption behind this approach is that to make a greater difference, one must mobilize the public to develop awareness and a sense of outrage about the issue.  For The March of Dimes, the mission of decreasing birth defects and pre-term birth would not be accomplished with medical research alone, and thus The March took to the streets to get the public involved with fighting for this cause.  Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is also a good example of an organization which used “a banner” to realize impact, namely a significant reduction of alcohol-related traffic accidents.  Our client, therefore, could consider starting a movement to generate awareness and outrage to help combat family violence.

Terracyle is an example of “expand the picture,” which posits that to make more of a difference, one must engage all involved components of the problem to be part of the solution. Terracyle started out working to eliminate food waste by using it to create quality fertilizers.  The fertilizers reduced some waste, but landfills kept filling, and so TerraCycle sought to make a broader impact.  Today, Terracyle focuses on eliminating many kinds of waste by creating new product lines and mobilizing people to recycle.  For our client, expanding the picture could mean not just working with the primarily low-income, female population it currently serves, but adding services for batterers, wealthy victims, or victims who choose to stay in relationship with their abusers.

Finally, “strength in numbers” is typified by East Meets West (EMW).  The premise here is that one organization can’t make a significant difference on large issues by itself; working together with others with similar missions means that the impact is exponentially increased.  East Meets West started out providing grassroots humanitarian aid in Vietnam, but they soon realized the problems were too big for them to significantly affect on their ownEMW transitioned from offering humanitarian services to building a network of similar organizations that share back-office capacity and learn valuable skills from one another.  Our client could realize this approach through creating a network of similar organizations or employing a regional or national expansion strategy to have a greater impact.

The problem of a persistent societal struggle is one that many non-profits face. These four approaches show how some nonprofits have addressed such struggles in ways that can be applied by others.